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Summer heat finally tipped for east coast states

Get your beach towel ready, summer is finally on the way.

Get your beach towel ready, summer is finally on the way. Photo: AAP

After a slow start to summer for east coast states, the mercury is finally predicted to start rising this week as the heatwave that has been searing Western Australia crosses the continent.

Warm conditions are predicted from Monday for northern South Australia, southern parts of the Northern Territory and Brisbane, while temperatures in the mid-30s are expected later in the week for Victoria and NSW.

The Bureau of Meteorology’s Dean Narramore said WA’s Pilbara region is looking at severe to extreme heatwave conditions, with temperatures of 48C to 49C.

“We could even see 50C around the Pilbara, but whether that hits one of our official observation stations, is not certain,” the senior meteorologist told AAP.

Those conditions mean large parts of the mainland are going to be subject to low-intensity heatwave conditions, Mr Narramore said.

The hottest Australian temperature ever recorded was 50.7C in the Pilbara town of Onslow on January 13 of 2023.

Roasted in the West

Onslow is located in the Shire of Ashburton, where local government president Audra Smith says residents are accustomed to extreme temperatures and weather over summer.

Speaking to AAP from Tom Price on Saturday morning, the mercury had already tipped 44C.

“We do, generally go up to the mid-40s quite often, but when it goes over that and closer to 50C it is a different heat,” she said.

“So we are mindful that it’s dangerous out in the heat and people mostly stay indoors and stay hydrated and try to look after one another, especially the elderly.”

Residents in those areas have been advised to seek a cool place to stay, such as a home, library, community centre or shopping centre.

-with AAP

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