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Melbourne Cup Carnival 2022: The winners, the protests, the fashion and four seasons in one day

Gold Trip has brushed aside an international challenge to win the Melbourne Cup, giving one of Australia’s biggest stables a breakthrough in the race.

One of five runners for co-trainers Ciaron Maher and David Eustace, Gold Trip defeated Emissary and stablemate High Emocean.

The five-year-old stallion was given a perfect ride by WA jockey Mark Zahra, who also celebrated his first win in the race.

He was runner-up on Gold Trip in the Caulfield Cup on October 15 and was determined to do one better.

Speaking immediately after crossing the winning line, he said it was an “unbelievable” feeling: “What a day. I got to the front a bit soon … that last 100 … just no-one come near me”.

“As they jammed up, I got to travel up and up and I thought I’m still travelling so good here.

“I waited and waited and with the horse I’ve always said when you go you’ve got to go. I was righto. And then I had a fair way to go.”

Despite chilly overnight temperatures, tens of thousands of racegoers headed to Flemington racecourse to usher in the most exciting three minutes in Australian sport, the 162nd running of the Melbourne Cup.

When the gates opened at 8.30am Tuesday, fans flocked trackside, to the numerous grandstands, to the expansive and rejuvenated Park area for music, food and fashion, and to the exclusive Birdcage Enclosure.

Sporting bold fascinators and ties and clutching umbrellas, crowds gathered in brightly-coloured frocks and tailored suits to watch the race that stops the nation.

With temperatures set to drop again to 11 degrees, the Bureau of Meteorology warned this could mark the coldest Cup day in almost 30 years

There was almost as much action outside the Flemington gates as animal rights activists turned heads with bold signs calling for an end to the “archaic” sport.

The Coalition for the Protection of Racehorses urged people to say “Nup to the Cup”, saying 139 racehorses died on Australian tracks in the past racing year.

In an unrelated incident, footage of an unidentified person allegedly breaking into the racecourse ahead of the Melbourne Cup surfaced.

A video posted on social media appears to show the alleged culprit pouring oil on the racetrack to protest the “toxic” racing industry.

Victoria Police is investigating.

By 11.30am, it was all about racing, the fashion and the weather.

The rain came in sideways, umbrellas came out – dampening the lawns and track, but not the spirit of the day, with crowds just excited to be back after a two-year hiatus.

The 10-race card kicked off with the Group 3 Darley Maribyrnong Plate (1000m) for two-year-olds and Group 3 The Hong Kong Jockey Club Stakes (1400m) for mares, plus the popular Subzero Handicap (1400m), a race restricted to grey horses and won by Love Tap (trained by Will Freedman).

With an expected crowd of 80,000, the centrepiece of the entire Cup carnival is the $8 million Melbourne Cup run over 3200m, scheduled to run at 3pm (AEDT).

Delta Goodrem and Ariarne Titmus were on the ground as Cup ambassadors, cricket legend Brian Lara and long-distance runner Nedd Brockman were spotted inside the Birdcage, and Cody Simpson was gearing up to sing the national anthem.

“This year, everyone is back together … to be able to watch the race that stops a nation,” Goodrem told host broadcaster the Ten network.

Added Simpson, who gets nerves before a big race as much as singing live: “I moved back to Australia last year, so it’s a timely thing, and the first time I have ever sung the national anthem in front of everyone.”

As Myer Fashions on the Field celebrated its 60th anniversary, the best dressed and best suited strutted the stage in the so-called Fashion Garden before final judging at 1.40pm.

Judges and carnival ambassadors included Christian Wilkins, Demi Brereton and Aaron Mitchell and Tayla Damir and Tim Kano.

Supermodel Adut Akech and racing heiress Kate Waterhouse led the star arrivals inside the exclusive Birdcage enclosure.

Before the Cup, the Welcome to Country was delivered from Uncle Colin Hunter before Melbourne Cup Carnival Ambassador and Olympic champion Ariarne Titmus walked the $275,000 Melbourne Cup trophy to the mounting yard and into the hands of Victoria Racing Club (VRC) chairman Neil Wilson.

Legendary Scottish-Australian musician Colin Hay, front man for Men at Work, performed a special rendition of their classic hit, Down Under.

The 22 jockeys, flag bearers and owners stood by as Simpson performed the national anthem.

The race following the Lexus Melbourne Cup was named after the late Queen (In Memory of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II over 1400m).

Let’s take a look at how the day unfolded.

Delta stuns in Dolce & Gabban. Photo: Getty

Cody Simpson and Ariarne Titmus were among the first to arrive in the prestigious Birdcage enclosure. Photo: AAP

Melbourne Cup Day started off dry. Photo: Getty

Blake Shinn returns to the mounting yard on Love Tap after winning the Resimax Group Subzero Handicap, a race named after the legendary grey. Photo: Getty 

Melbourne Cup Day is also about families, and tradition. Photo: Getty

Stunning fashion is all part of the Melbourne Cup Carnival, as this racegoer makes her way to The Birdcage. Photo: AAP

Myer’s Fashion on the Field contestant. Photo: AAp

MasterChef Australia presenters Andy Allen, Melissa Leong and Jock Zonfrillo. Photo: AAP

Christian Wilkins, the model son of Channel Nine presenter Richard Wilkins wore a pastel green tailored silk suit with dark green platform heels and a red bow tie. Photo: Flemingtonvrc/Instagram

Brooke Warne in a bright, red pants suit inside the Birdcage. Photo: Brooke Warne/Instagram

Everyone wore red today, from hosts and commentators including Francesca Cumani and Michelle Payne to Australian model Rebecca Judd  inside the Birdcage. Photo: AAP

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